HomePath Financing Foreclosures

Wow, what a great option for home financing!   Fannie Mae properties listed on their website www.homepath.com are eligible for HomePath mortgages.  HomePath is offered exclusively to borrowers buying homes from Fannie Mae.  There are options for Primary Residences, Second Homes and Investment properties to include Single Family Residences and Condominiums.   Primary residences require a minimum of 3% down payment, with 10% down payment on Second Homes and Investment properties. 

 A few advantages to mention regarding the benefits of HomePath financing are No PMI (private mortgage insurance), No Appraisal, No Condo Questionnaire, and No need to fix repairs to qualify for financing.

Generally, if the borrower does not have 20% down payment, mortgage insurance would be required.  No mortgage insurance can save a borrower thousands of dollars over the life of the loan. For example, if the mortgage insurance is $100 per month, with a minimum of 5 years to keep on the mortgage, that is $6000 over the life of the loan.  With Homepath financing, mortgage insurance would not be required, thus a huge savings to the borrower. 

There can be many issues with a house appraising.  With HomePath, the sales price is used as the property value.  Fannie Mae has determined the price and the lender will accept that value without an appraisal.

Condominiums do not require a review except to verify that the project is not a Condotel.  This would avoid the need for a condo questionnaire to be completed.  The information contained on the condo questionnaire may make a condo ineligible for financing under normal conventional financing.    With HomePath, that would not be an issue.  Another great advantage is that some lenders have no additional LTV limits that would apply to Florida properties. 

A Fannie Mae-owned house or condominium may need repairs but would not be able to be completed prior to purchase. By applying for a HomePath mortgage, which doesn't require a property inspection or appraisal, the borrower would be able to finance the property and make the repairs after closing.  HomePath allows for 6% seller contributions for Primary and Second Homes, and 2% seller contributions for Investment Property. This could allow the borrower to keep more of their closing costs money in their own pocket to complete the repairs needed after closing. 

Happy to answer your questions on HomePath Financing.

Dawn M. Houser Senior Mortgage Banker

Phone:  239-464-9455   / Fax:  866-686-5382  / Email:  Dawn.Houser@aemc.cc

 

 

SECURITY DEPOSIT TIME LIMIT

 

Your old tenant is moving out and you have a new one coming in.  Let’s say the old tenant left in a hurry, so you and staff have to now move out the trash and leftover belongings, steam the carpet, repaint the walls, do minor repair work.  There’s a huge chunk of change from the security deposit that you want to use to cover expenses.  You think to yourself you have 30 days to notify the previous tenant of your plans to use the funds to cover rehabilitation expenses.  That’s well within your rights.

What if you only use part of the deposit for repairs and/or rehabilitation?  Still think you have the full 30 days to deliver the remaining balance of the previous tenant’s deposit?  Not so, says Florida Law.  You have fifteen days to return the rest of the deposit to the previous tenant if you are not making any claim. That means, if you don’t have to do any cleaning, repairs or rehabilitation that requires you to take some/part/all of the previous tenant’s deposit, you have fifteen days to return/refund the full amount. If not, then you are opening yourself and the corporation to a lawsuit (and potential add-on fees that would double or triple what you would have to pay). So, be sure to ask your company’s attorney or the attorney you have on hand to handle your real estate/tenant legal issues.   The last thing you would need is to have to pay thousands of dollars, in addition to returning the previous tenant’s deposit, when you first were notified of the tenant’s intent to vacate the premises.