HURRICANE POOL PREPERATION GUIDE

Fortunately Brevard County, FL had very little impact from Hurricane Isaac, but the hurricane season is still upon us for a few months. The last thing you want to worry about is what to do with your swimming pool or spa. Blu Water Pool Service has prepared a list of what to do with your swimming pool if a storm or hurricane is approaching.

Following are some do's and don'ts for swimming pools in reference to hurricanes:

Do:

Shock or super chlorinate your pool (in the event of long utility outages, it may be your only source of water) It may be necessary after the storm to use the pool water for flushing toilets and other water uses by the old hand carry bucket method) Be very careful of this tropical storms bring rain and other unknown items AND CONTAMINATS into the pool. DO NOT USE AS DRINKING OR BATHING WATER.

Shut off the power (by simply flipping the breaker) to your pool pump and/or automation systems, heaters or heat pumps (may help to prevent against damage from electrical surges during and after storms).

Deck drains/gutters are clean and free of debris; this is only a small safeguard against keeping water out of your home if flooding occurs.

Screen Enclosures: I spoke with the screen contractor and this is their suggestion: Look to see if the enclosures Tapcon’s, screws and 

braces are good, tight and built up to strength. He suggested on screen panels that: you shouldn’t tear them out or cut the screen what happens if it doesn’t come). I look at it this way it is a screen and aluminum structure. Storms if large enough can take down concrete walls. Preventative Maintenance always helps so contact a screen professional to get advice from them if you are concerned and want advice. If you want their number call the office and we can get you hooked up with Intercoastal Screen, Inc. 321-480-4313

Prune Branches of Trees and Shrubs In your pool area you should prune dying and weak branches of trees and shrubs so they do not end up breaking off and finding their way into the pool and equipment.

Do not:

Drain any water whatsoever out of your pool (we like in ground pools "in the ground") Flooding occurs when the soil is saturated with water or you live in low lying areas. Many pool owners believe that draining their swimming pools or spas before a storm hits will keep it from overflowing and flooding their property. Wrong. Properly built or installed pools should be equipped with overflows that will drain excess water. If you want to slightly empty the water level, lower it no more than to the bottom of the waterline tile (12”). Otherwise, the hydrostatic pressure can be too strong, possibly causing the pool to "float" or "pop" out of the ground, according to the The Official Broward County Hurricane Preparedness Guide. The water in your pool serves as a kind of shield, protecting your pool's finish from the effects of flying debris.

Put patio furniture in the pool (difficult to remove) it's safer inside than lying at the bottom of the pool which could also hurt you or someone else when trying to get it out.

Remove your pool pump, really, wouldn't you rather board up windows or chase garden gnomes down……..do most people even know how to do that? Not only you may leave exposed electrical wires and we know what happens when power and water mix. It is not a good combination.

After the Storm: CPR for Your Pool until the Professionals can get to you. Once you've received clearance to return home and have taken care of other more critical and emotional assessments of damage, you can address the pool or spa. You'll want:

Visually inspect your pool pump, motor, filter, heater etc for any damage. Let the motor dry for at least 24 hours before the system is turned back on. If it is underwater stop do nothing and call us.

Clean out debris from swimming pool to keep it from staining permanently and keeping system free of debris. Unless there is way too much or you are worried then call us.

Check pool water: Call with any concerns in the meantime: Balance water pH, super chlorinate or shock your pool, and run the filter until the water becomes clear.

Don't allow anyone to use your pool right before or after super chlorination. Wait until the pool water is healthy and safe.

DO NOT DRAIN: It may be tempting if your pool is a disastrous mess, but, again, don't drain it.

In short, if you are confused about how to handle your pool…….call one of our property maintenance coordinators….Words of Wisdom…. Do not Google!!!!!

Thank you Blu Water Pool Service, for providing this important information. 

The Effects of Rain and Weather on Your Pool Water

Feature post from Joe & Wendy Hale, Blu Water Pool Service, Inc.

The rain levels have definitely increased this year which is excellent for the environment but can wreak havoc on your pools. Normally any pool needs service once a week, but we are seeing an average of 2-3 rain storms a week now in our area. It is always best if the pool has been shocked not to go in for 24 hours after treatment the pool needs filtration longer than normal. If a lot of rain has occurred techs will return to properties to check on the water balance the next day. Our goal is to have you swimming again as quickly as possible.

Here is some helpful future information:

 

 The Effects of Rain and Weather on Your Pool Water

Rain and other weather conditions have a big effect on your pool, so pool care must take some factors into consideration. In general, rain and wind add the following to the pool:

• Contaminants that provide food for algae and bacteria growth

• Contaminates that consume chlorine residual

• Fresh algae spores

Understanding the Chemistry

Rain and wind collect contaminates from the atmosphere as it falls to the ground. These contaminates have an immediate effect on the pool water. As contaminates enter the pool, the chlorine in the water, using its oxidizing power, will attack the contaminates. This will remove the contaminates from the water and simultaneously deplete the chlorine level!

Whenever contaminates entering the water exceed the amount of the pool’s chlorine oxidizing power, the free chlorine level will drop to zero and leave some un-oxidized contaminates in the water. The remaining contaminates feed the growth of bacteria and algae. Overnight, the pool can turn hazy and algae growth can become visible.

Rain often affects the pH also. Many rains are “acid,” thus causing the pH to lower. That’s why it’s important to monitor your pH after rains.

How to Respond

Regular, weekly shocking removes the normal amount of contaminates that build up in the water. Yet, a rain can suddenly add abnormal amounts of contaminates, which require an additional, immediate treatment. Whenever a pool is exposed to such rains and winds, you should practice the following:

1. Check the pH level. If the pH is low, delay adjusting the pH until after you’ve given the pool a chlorine shock, since most chlorine shocks slightly increase the pH. If the pH is high, lower it to 7.2-7.4 fast!

2. Check the chlorine level. If the chlorine level is below 1.5 ppm, give the pool a boosting shock of 1 lb per 10,000 gal.

3. Whenever you see cloudiness or visible signs of algae, immediately give the pool a double shock of 2 lb per every 10,000 gal of water. You want to stop the growth and restore clarity before it worsens.

 

Hot Weather

Hot weather results in warmer water temperatures. Warm water, specifically any over 84 degrees, causes the following:

• Increased chance of algae growth

• Increased consumption of chlorine

As temperatures rise, it’s important to increase your rate of chlorine feed to maintain the proper chlorine level

Joe & Wendy Hale

Blu Water Pool Service, Inc.

 321-242-8231 / www.bluwaternow.com

BluWaterPools@earthlink.net