Store in Between Moves During Holiday Season with POD’s

POD's have helped hundreds of thousands of families to move over the last decade, and they  listened and watched to find out the best ways to pack and move using our containers. The products offered are designed to protect your belongings and keep your things safe, and were  based on the advice from other customers just like you! Finding time to house hunt is difficult–especially for sellers during the holiday season. Everyone is busy with family events, holiday pageants and last minute shopping.  PODS are the perfect solution for short- and long-term storage:

 

  • Convenience and ease of moving during the holiday season
  • Use a POD's Moving check list to keep organized
  • Sellers we suggest you don't 'over' decorate especially if it takes away from the curb appeal, not to mention time savings with your move.

 

PODS can help sellers:

  • Declutter their homes to help sell them faster and for more money
  • Utilize temporary storage between moves
  • Move across town or across the country

ERA Select Services offers a discount to owners selling with ERA Showcase Properties. Contact me for more details.

SECURITY DEPOSIT TIME LIMIT

 

Your old tenant is moving out and you have a new one coming in.  Let’s say the old tenant left in a hurry, so you and staff have to now move out the trash and leftover belongings, steam the carpet, repaint the walls, do minor repair work.  There’s a huge chunk of change from the security deposit that you want to use to cover expenses.  You think to yourself you have 30 days to notify the previous tenant of your plans to use the funds to cover rehabilitation expenses.  That’s well within your rights.

What if you only use part of the deposit for repairs and/or rehabilitation?  Still think you have the full 30 days to deliver the remaining balance of the previous tenant’s deposit?  Not so, says Florida Law.  You have fifteen days to return the rest of the deposit to the previous tenant if you are not making any claim. That means, if you don’t have to do any cleaning, repairs or rehabilitation that requires you to take some/part/all of the previous tenant’s deposit, you have fifteen days to return/refund the full amount. If not, then you are opening yourself and the corporation to a lawsuit (and potential add-on fees that would double or triple what you would have to pay). So, be sure to ask your company’s attorney or the attorney you have on hand to handle your real estate/tenant legal issues.   The last thing you would need is to have to pay thousands of dollars, in addition to returning the previous tenant’s deposit, when you first were notified of the tenant’s intent to vacate the premises.

 

GOING, GOING, GONE!

Evictions:  everyone loves them!  Residents enjoy seeing the writ of eviction taped to their door, Sheriff’s deputies enjoy serving papers to weeping, hysterical parents and managers of the residence enjoy confrontation it brings.  

     No one, I repeat, no one enjoys evictions.  It is a last resort for those residents who have failed to pay rent or have been such horrible, terrible people that they must absolutely leave the premises: This time by force (legal and otherwise).  Maybe they didn’t pay rent the past three or four months, or their checks continually bounced; maybe they have had complaints racked up against them for housing, noise or litter violations.  Maybe it was a combination of everything. 

     For whatever reason, now you’ve got to start the proceedings for eviction.  You post the notice on their door…and nothing happens.  Did they ignore the posting?  Not see it?  Are they not in the premises anymore?  So, you look in the unit and it’s as if they just stepped out for milk and bread.  Their furniture is still there, clothes still in the closets, food in the kitchen.  What now?

     Legally, there are steps you should take.  First and foremost, review.  Go back through your files, and make sure that the eviction was not performed in error, and do whatever it takes to contact the evicted resident. Do everything in your power to contact the evicted resident. Can’t locate the resident and everything’s in order?  Then you and your staff can remove the belongings to the property line.  The last thing you need is for an evicted resident to get out or jail or an institution, only to discover that you took all their personal property to the property line and that it is now all gone.