Here, the disease meets a society that is wonderfully cared for. “This applies to ventilators and health care as a whole, as well as social welfare.

Here, the disease meets a society that is wonderfully cared for. “This applies to ventilators and health care as a whole, as well as social welfare.

East believes that large differences can be expected between rich and poor countries. “Here with us, the disease meets a society that is wonderfully cared for.” This applies to both ventilators and health care in general, as well as social welfare. In poor countries job loss usually leads directly to existential needs. Every plague epidemic once automatically meant a starving population, Leven said. That is now threatening in poorer countries.

No development can be reliably predicted. “You cannot judge a pandemic in which you are still in the middle of it,” emphasizes Osten. Leven says: “The whole thing is an experiment that involves the entire world population. Anything is possible.”

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corona

– “Saving lives” at a high economic price ”

Almost 7.8 billion people live on earth. Even a very contagious virus takes a while to conquer such a population. This extends the time required for countermeasures to a length that is risky for the economy and society.

On the corona situation in Austria

Experts had warned against it. Again and again for years. Now it is here, the next global disease pathogen. And with such power that many heads of state speak of a “war”. The novel coronavirus has been spreading for about three months – and we are still at the beginning of the pandemic. “We are in the pandemic marathon at kilometer two out of 42,” says the virologist Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM) in Hamburg. “China is around ten kilometer.”

The beginning:

At the beginning of December, perhaps as early as November, the first cases of a previously unknown lung disease will occur in the Chinese metropolis of Wuhan. Those affected previously stayed at an animal market, which has since been considered the origin of the novel coronavirus. The cases from China will not be officially reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) until December 31.

On January 9th, China reports: The lung disease is due to a new type of corona virus. On the same day, a 61-year-old infected with the virus dies – the first officially recorded death from the pandemic.123me The new pathogen belongs to the same type of virus as the SARS virus, it is just a different variant, says virologist Christian Drosten from the Berlin Charite in mid-January.

Many still find it hard to believe that a tiny particle can undermine human societies. “Epidemics are historically the normal state,” emphasizes Karl-Heinz Leven from the Institute for the History and Ethics of Medicine at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

From regional epidemics to pandemic:

In mid-January, the virus was first detected outside of China – in a woman in Thailand who had visited Wuhan. In Japan, hundreds of people are infected on the cruise ship “Diamond Princess”. In South Korea, the Shincheonji Church of Jesus sect becomes a main driver of the outbreak.

Also read: Corona crisis: “There is no contrary opinion”

The virus reaches Europe at the end of January: the first cases are recorded in France, and an infection in a 33-year-old in Bavaria in Germany. There are probably already many undiscovered infections – for example in Italy, where an immense outbreak starts at the end of February. Spain is also one of the very hard hit countries. In mid-March, the WHO classifies the outbreak as a pandemic.

The strategy:

Hardly anyone would have thought possible the arsenal of measures with which states are taking action against the spread of the virus: shops, restaurants, museums, schools, daycare centers are closing. Entire workforces switch to the home office, production chains come to a standstill. Sports events – even the Olympic Games – have been canceled. Borders are being closed, restricted areas are being set up, and assembly bans and exit restrictions are being issued. Over 1.5 billion people worldwide are currently barely allowed to leave their homes.

The “hammer and dance” strategy is currently considered the most effective in professional circles, says Alena Buyx from the Institute for the History and Ethics of Medicine at the Technical University of Munich. In the beginning there would be drastic measures to slow down the increase. This is followed by what is known as dance – a phase in which one gradually returns to more normal behavior.

“The rolling back of the global lockdown could take a long time.”

The effect of measures becomes visible in the number of cases after ten to 14 days, explains Schmidt-Chanasit. “The first thing to do is to loosen the screws that are crucial for security of supply.” This includes the opening of schools and daycare centers. “At the very end there is football and other fun events.”

The rolling back of the global lockdown could take a long time. “As long as a large part of the population is not immune, the virus can still spread,” says Mirjam Kretzschmar from the Utrecht University Medical Center. “As soon as the measures are relaxed, the number of reproductions goes back to the original value and the spread continues as before the measures. That only changes when a substantial part of the population has become immune.”

The coming weeks:

The contamination of 60 to 70 percent of the population, which is necessary for natural subsidence, will not be reached this year, says Schmidt-Chanasit. This makes it all the more important to rapidly expand the medical infrastructure – for example with more intensive care beds and ventilators. The “hammer and dance” strategy may protect against overloading the health systems, but in the long run it has immense social and economic consequences. Although harsh measures such as exit bans have only been in place in many countries for days, critical voices are increasing.

“Saving human lives comes at a high economic price.”

“Saving human lives comes at a high economic price,” says Philipp Osten from the Institute for the History and Ethics of Medicine at the UKE University Hospital in Hamburg. Experts believe that the costs are likely to exceed anything known from economic crises or natural disasters over the past few decades.

Experts fear that this in turn could increase the number of deaths in the wake of depression, impoverishment, social upheaval, domestic violence or even heart attacks. The currently postponed operations are also a factor. “The measures against Corona must not cost more human lives than Corona itself,” says Schmidt-Chanasit. “A reasonable sense of proportion is important.” When does the damage caused by the downtime exceed the benefits of the measures? How many lives saved outweigh how much wealth and social security? Ethically an incredibly difficult question. If not for everyone.

Have a listen: Corona – the end of neoliberalism?

Better to save the economy than grandpa – the Lieutenant Governor of Texas, Dan Patrick, has made this demand clearer than any other politician. The 69-year-old Republican told Fox News that he was ready to risk his life to save the US from an economic collapse. US President Donald Trump also thinks that the consequences of protective measures were more devastating than those of the pandemic. “You will lose more people by plunging the country into a massive recession or depression,” he argues. “More people will die.”

The world after:

Is a devastating recession looming now? Leven says that everything is being shut down on such an immense scale worldwide in the fight against an epidemic is a historically new approach and can therefore hardly be assessed by means of comparisons. But there is certainly the risk of having to deal with consequences such as mass unemployment and political upheaval. “The gratifying forms of solidarity that can currently be seen will not be the norm,” believes Leven. “We’ll see a few more surprises, and mostly negative ones.”

According to the medical historian, epidemic times have always been a test of the political system in terms of its credibility and the trust of the citizens in its ability to act. Historians are divided on whether the pandemic will have a stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the political order, says the UKE expert Osten.

East believes that large differences can be expected between rich and poor countries. “Here with us, the disease meets a society that is wonderfully cared for.” This applies to both ventilators and health care in general, as well as social welfare. In poor countries job loss usually leads directly to existential needs. Every plague epidemic once automatically meant a starving population, Leven said. That is now threatening in poorer countries.

No development can be reliably predicted. “You cannot judge a pandemic in which you are still in the middle of it,” emphasizes Osten. Leven says: “The whole thing is an experiment that involves the entire world population. Anything is possible.”

Read news for 1 month now for free! * * The test ends automatically.

More on this ▶

NEWS FROM THE NETWORK

Win true wireless earphones from JBL now! (E-media.at)

New access (yachtrevue.at)

8 reasons why it’s great to be single (lustaufsleben.at)

Salmon shrimp burger with wasabi mayonnaise and honey cucumber (gusto.at)

In the new trend: Shock-Down – how long can the economy withstand lockdowns? (Trend.at)

The 35 best family series to laugh and feel good (tv-media.at)

E-Scooter in Vienna: All providers and prices 2020 in comparison (autorevue.at)

Comments

register

Connect with Facebook

corona

– “Saving lives” at a high economic price ”

Almost 7.8 billion people live on earth. Even a very contagious virus takes a while to conquer such a population. This extends the time required for countermeasures to a length that is risky for the economy and society.

On the corona situation in Austria

Experts had warned against it. Again and again for years. Now it is here, the next global disease pathogen. And with such power that many heads of state speak of a “war”. The novel coronavirus has been spreading for about three months – and we are still at the beginning of the pandemic. “We are in the pandemic marathon at kilometer two out of 42,” says the virologist Jonas Schmidt-Chanasit from the Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine (BNITM) in Hamburg. “China is around ten kilometer.”

The beginning:

At the beginning of December, perhaps as early as November, the first cases of a previously unknown lung disease will occur in the Chinese metropolis of Wuhan. Those affected previously stayed at an animal market, which has since been considered the origin of the novel coronavirus. The cases from China will not be officially reported to the World Health Organization (WHO) until December 31.

On January 9th, China reports: The lung disease is due to a new type of corona virus. On the same day, a 61-year-old infected with the virus dies – the first officially recorded death from the pandemic. The new pathogen belongs to the same type of virus as the SARS virus, it is just a different variant, says virologist Christian Drosten from the Berlin Charite in mid-January.

Many still find it hard to believe that a tiny particle can undermine human societies. “Epidemics are historically the normal state,” emphasizes Karl-Heinz Leven from the Institute for the History and Ethics of Medicine at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg.

From regional epidemics to pandemic:

In mid-January, the virus was first detected outside of China – in a woman in Thailand who had visited Wuhan. In Japan, hundreds of people are infected on the cruise ship “Diamond Princess”. In South Korea, the Shincheonji Church of Jesus sect becomes a main driver of the outbreak.

Also read: Corona crisis: “There is no contrary opinion”

The virus reaches Europe at the end of January: the first cases are recorded in France, and an infection in a 33-year-old in Bavaria in Germany. There are probably already many undiscovered infections – for example in Italy, where an immense outbreak starts at the end of February. Spain is also one of the very hard hit countries. In mid-March, the WHO classifies the outbreak as a pandemic.

The strategy:

Hardly anyone would have thought possible the arsenal of measures with which states are taking action against the spread of the virus: shops, restaurants, museums, schools, daycare centers are closing. Entire workforces switch to the home office, production chains come to a standstill. Sports events – even the Olympic Games – have been canceled. Borders are being closed, restricted areas are being set up, and assembly bans and exit restrictions are being issued. Over 1.5 billion people worldwide are currently barely allowed to leave their homes.

The “hammer and dance” strategy is currently considered the most effective in professional circles, says Alena Buyx from the Institute for the History and Ethics of Medicine at the Technical University of Munich. In the beginning there would be drastic measures to slow down the increase. This is followed by what is known as dance – a phase in which one gradually returns to more normal behavior.

“The rolling back of the global lockdown could take a long time.”

The effect of measures becomes visible in the number of cases after ten to 14 days, explains Schmidt-Chanasit. “The first thing to do is to loosen the screws that are crucial for security of supply.” This includes the opening of schools and daycare centers. “At the very end there is football and other fun events.”

The rolling back of the global lockdown could take a long time. “As long as a large part of the population is not immune, the virus can still spread,” says Mirjam Kretzschmar from the Utrecht University Medical Center. “As soon as the measures are relaxed, the number of reproductions goes back to the original value and the spread continues as before the measures. That only changes when a substantial part of the population has become immune.”

The coming weeks:

The contamination of 60 to 70 percent of the population, which is necessary for natural subsidence, will not be reached this year, says Schmidt-Chanasit.

Comments are closed.